Statements

Um, yeah. even the notion of making declarative statements makes me uneasy. Writing an artist’s statement is no joke. I want to sound smart and my work be interesting. I need it to make sense and I have to make it sound like I’m solving some problem or making something really cutting edge. Yikes! Here it is (towards the bottom of the post) in it’s pretty finished form and I’m well on my way to having things packaged and ready to ship. If I was nervous last week…

our latest collaboration

Procrastination is not my friend. I can find a million things to occupy my mind besides what I’ve set out to do like, getting super cute hair cuts, buying Thundercats toys on ebay,crafty things, cleaning projects (Milo’s closet must be clean before I can work on this), hanging at my brother’s house pretending to like football ( I do like his company), etc, etc. so I got a lot done and now it’s nine  on Sunday night and I’ve just now finished.

I think Wyatt likes my hair

For the luckiest kid in the world...Two Lion-Os and only one comes with chew marks on it's hand

As I was writing earlier today, Milo wanted to know what I was doing and I told him that I was writing about why I make art. I asked him why he likes to make art. First he insisted that he type his name  and then he told me to type his own artist’s statement:

Milo Fessler

I like when everyone likes my art. I like when everyone likes me. I like people. I like Mommy. I really like when I bring them to the art show. Everyone loves my art. I love everyone, yeah! I like to make art because it makes people happy.

I love you Uncle Daniel and Bobo and King Kong Bungee (Bundy). The end.

King Kong Bundy is our good buddy. Jon and I got him on our honeymoon.

That about sums it up. Maybe I should hire Milo to write my statement. Here’s mine:

The act of making marks has been central to my life since I was a very young child. I am drawn to creating something out of nothing. As an art teacher in a high-poverty school, as a parent of two boys and as a painter, my everyday life is all about making new things happen with little resources. It is my goal to make work that is representative of living a creative life and to share that work on a larger scale.

I begin each watercolor with a simple mark or wash of color. I then move intuitively through the work layering washes and marks created from a brush, stencil or everyday objects like bottle caps and spools of thread. Caps and spools create circles of various sizes. The circle is the first mark that children make to represent people, places and things. I use circles as a child would, a universally representational symbol. My paintings are a bold and earthy response to my appreciation for the tensions that exist in everyday life, the desire for both simplicity and complexity, large and small spaces, inner and outer worlds, natural and urban landscapes, solitude and relationships, excitement and calm. Through my use of the most basic elements of art, color, line and shape, I am able to create a balanced and storied environment. In each new painting, the viewer is able to find connections to the contradictory nature of life.

In my most recent body of work, I completed 100 paintings in 100 days. Each painting is an 8” x 8” work made in one day. This classic exercise allowed me to bring painting into my everyday life. My three year old son made art alongside me almost every day. Making art has become central to our lives and we continue to express ourselves good, bad, and ordinary each day.

Make sense?

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2 responses to “Statements

  1. well done, both of you 🙂
    ps like you weren’t enough of a hottie before…

  2. At UMD (Minnesota Duluth) They had a class many years ago with some prestigious name but interpreted down to how to talk art B.S. Unfortunately I did not get to take it!

    BUT an artist statement is all bout what they do from the heart and instinct…you wrote it well! Congrats on sticking to goals! Love you!

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